Tag Archives: poem

Halloween


My audiobook recording published by LibriVox.org

Hallowe’en
by Virna Shear (Canadian poet)

There is an old Italian legend which says that on the eve of the beloved festival of All Saints (Hallowe’en) the souls of the dead return to earth for a little while and go by on the wind. The feast of All Saints is followed by the feast of the dead, when for a day only the sound of the Miserere is heard throughout the cities of Italy.

Hark! Hark to the wind! ‘Tis the night, they say,
When all souls come back from the far away—
The dead, forgotten this many a day!

And the dead remembered—ay! long and well—
And the little children whose spirits dwell
In God’s green garden of asphodel.

Have you reached the country of all content, 0 souls we know, since the day you went From this time-worn world, where your years were spent?

Would you come back to the sun and the rain,
The sweetness, the strife, the thing we call pain,
And then unravel life’s tangle again?

I lean to the dark—Hush!—was it a sigh?
Or the painted vine-leaves that rustled by?
Or only a night-bird’s echoing cry?

This poem and its cover image are in the Public Domain.

Burning A Bristly Relationship

I watered the bush each day
that I had water.
I shone all the light on it
that I found in me,
and said, “See how well it grows!”

Our relationship grew thorns that tangled in the arid heat,
and resilient prickers in the rain of my tears.
It shadowed my heart.
Its roots plugged my veins,
and died at midnight.

Its skeleton in me:
tinder flared
fire flashed.
Recovery blew away ash.
I see a world beyond.

Burning Relationship
Image credits:
Burning Brush, by Grace Buchanan. Composition elements:
Flames and Brush, by Michael Pollak. Used under Creative Commons License BY-2.0.
Apfelbaum in Alberschwende, by böhringer friedrich. Used under Creative Commons License BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons.

Happy Mental Health Month!

May is Mental Health month here. I am practicing dealing with my anger:

  • Don’t tell anyone what to do
  • Get in touch with what I am feeling and what I’m wanting
  • Tell someone how I’m feeling
  • Focus on what I can do to get what I want

Binocular Perception

Binocular PerceptionBinocular Perception

I looked out the window
at the apple tree

One eye on each side of the mullion
Each saw a different picture
though so close to each other

Then I thought:
If my 2 eyes are so close to each other
and see so differently
then how can any 2 people
who are much farther apart
look at anything
especially God
and see the same thing?

As I stand on one side of the apple tree
and tell you about where the apples and branches are
and what shapes and colors they are
And as you stand on another side of the tree
and tell me where the apples and branches are
and what shapes and colors they are

Let’s remember that we have 2 different views of the same thing
And we are both correct.


dedicated to Judith Henry
who inspired me to poeticize this revelation from decades ago
I hope you enjoy your celebrations today.

 

Image credits:
Binocular Perception, composed by Grace Buchanan.
Apfelbaum in Alberschwende, by Böhringer Friedrich (Own work), via Wikimedia Commons. Used under Creative Commons License  BY-SA 2.5.
New Windows 017, by Roger Mommaerts. Used under Creative Commons License BY-SA 2.0.

What’s Shocking?

When I was a kid
We shocked adults
By talking about the weather
Saying, “It’s colder than a witch’s tit.”

Now, as adults
We can’t shock our kids
By talking about the weather
Even when we say, “The glaciers are melting.”

Media Credit:
This video shows a time series of five-year global temperature averages, mapped from 1884 to 2014, as estimated by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York.

Published on Jan 16, 2015 by NASA Goddard.
The year 2014 now ranks as the warmest on record since 1880, according to an analysis by NASA scientists.
This video is public domain.