Tag Archives: literature

The Best Nonsense Verses, Collected by Josephine Dodge Daskam

Nonsense
The Best Nonsense Verses, Collected by Josephine Dodge Daskam

From Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky to limericks written by Edward Lear, some of the crankiest, most logical and lyrical people turn common sense upside-down. May they inspire the child inside of you to find your way through the most challenging situations with a new set of eyes!

Josephine Dodge Daskam, aka Josephine Daskam Bacon, selected these nonsense verses with the permission of their authors Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, W.S. Gilbert, Guy Wetmore Carryl, Charles E. Carryl, Oliver Herford, Gelett Burgess, George du Maurier, and Rudyard Kipling.

The Best Nonsense Verses, read for you by Grace Buchanan:


Read the entire book at Project Gutenberg.

Listen to the entire collection of verses at LibriVox.

Listen to all the work that I’ve done for LibriVox.

This is a LibriVox recording. All LIbriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: LibriVox.org.

Image credit:
CD cover designed by Grace Buchanan. Illustrations:
54, from A Book of Nonsense, by Edward Lear, via Wikimedia Commons;
Grandfathers little nurse, by Paul Hey, via U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Public domain

April Twilights And Other Poems, by Willa Cather

April Twilights and Other Poems, by Willa Cather
April Twilights And Other Poems, by Willa Cather

Such a beautiful collection of Willa Cather’s poems. I enjoy how she expresses the appearance of landscapes and the feelings of difficult emotions.

This was one of her several efforts to publish these poems. First, she submitted many of them to magazines. Then she published some in her first book in 1903, which she titled simply, “April Twilights”. This 1923 collection was the second edition. She followed it with a third edition ten years later*.

I had the honor of performing the first poem “Grandmither, Think Not I Forget”, which I understand was one of her favorites. She wrote the finished verse in her first draft; she never saw any need to edit it*.

Grandmither, Think Not I Forget“, performed for you by Grace Buchanan.

Read the entire book “April Twilights And Other Poems” at Project Gutenberg.

Listen to all the work that I’ve done for LibriVox.

Listen to the entire book “April Twilights And Other Poems” at LibriVox. I read:
Track 1 “Grandmither, Think Not I Forget”
Track  2 “Fides, Spes”
Track  4 “The Hawthorn Tree”
Track 11 “Evening Song”

This is a LibriVox recording. All LIbriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: LibriVox.org.

Image credit:
Illustration “Twilight“, by Anna Sophia Towne Darrah via Wikimedia Commons. CD cover design by Tomas Peter for LibriVox, Public Domain.

The Man On The Other Side, by Ada Barnett

CD cover showing the title, author, and an image of a woman walking along a farm path on a bright summer day
The Man On The Other Side, by Ada Barnett, copyright 1922

As I recorded the first two chapters of this book, I felt grabbed by its paranormal theme. I appreciate the boldness of the main character as she learns to honor the relationship that she develops with the previous owner of her Sussex farm — who is deceased. It made me ponder my own openness to interacting with people who are no longer “here”.

The Man On The Other Side, Chapters One and Two read by Grace Buchanan for LibriVox.

Download or listen to the entire novel at The Internet Archive.

Listen to the entire novel at YouTube.

Listen to the entire novel at LibriVox.

Download or read the entire book “The Man on the Other Side” at Project Gutenberg.

Listen to all the work that I’ve done for LibriVox.

This is a LibriVox recording. All LIbriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: LibriVox.org.

Image credit:
CD cover illustration “Silence of the Evening” by Ferdinand Hodler. Cover design by TriciaG for LibriVox.org, Public domain.

North and South, Chapter One, by Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

“Edith had rolled herself up into a soft ball of muslin and ribbon, and silken curls, and gone off into a peaceful little after-dinner nap.” — from Chapter 1, North and South, by Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell.

“The first chapter of a book is often the hook to draw a reader in. It could make you eager for more or realize it isn’t for you.” Lynne T of LibriVox

The characters in the first chapter of North and South drew me in. This story gives us a glimpse of conditions for several social classes in 19th century Victorian Sussex England.

North and South, Chapter 1 read by Grace Buchanan for LibriVox.


I’m looking forward to recording this book in its entirety.

Read the entire book “North and South” at Project Gutenberg.

Listen to all the work that I’ve done for LibriVox.

Listen to a collection of first chapters of fiction and nonfiction books at LibriVox

This chapter is Track 11 in the LibriVox First Chapter Collection 7.

This is a LibriVox recording. All LIbriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: LibriVox.org.

Image credit:
frontispiece, North And South, illustration via Gutenberg.org, Public Domain