All posts by WeaverGrace

About WeaverGrace

Stimulating discussions solve problems

A Pair of Silk Stockings by Kate Chopin

I thought that the author was harshly judging the main character of this story for her selfish thoughtlessness, but then I started to see that there is a tone of compassion for people who give of themselves so selflessly that they become deliriously starved for self nurturance.
Read by Grace Buchanan · A Pair of Silk Stockings by Kate Chopin

This short story was originally published in an 1897 issue of Vogue Magazine, and was then included in the author’s book, “The Awakening, and Selected Short Stories“. I like how the author’s voice trips along from one scene to another.

Please be careful as you tend to the needs of others, especially during this pandemic, to make sure that you are tending to your own creature needs. Please keep in touch with your sense of comfort, peace, and wellness.

Read the entire book “The Awakening and Selected Short Stories” at Project Gutenberg.

Listen to all the work that I’ve done for LIbriVox.

This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: librivox.org.

Image credit:
Kate Chopin Portrait, Photographer not credited / Public domain

This story was included in the LibriVox Short Story Collection 86. It is #17 of the 20 stories.

Miss Crespigny, Chapter One, by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Chapter One read by Grace Buchanan for LibriVox.


Listen to the entire book at Internet Archive. I recorded Chapters One and Two.

Read the entire book at Project Gutenberg.

Listen to all the work that I’ve done for LIbriVox

This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: librivox.org.

Image credit:
This original book cover c. 1878 is in the public domain.

I wish that copyright law offered longer-lasting protection for artists. After all, when a person owns physical property, they can control how that passes down to their heirs. Conversely, authors and their heirs only own the stories for a limited time, and then anyone can reproduce and sell them however they’d like without permission from the creator or anyone else.

As stated in the Author’s Note at the beginning of this book, someone published Mrs. Burnett’s work without her permission, and in a way that she didn’t like.

I feel bad when I record books like this one that are in the public domain. The authors and their heirs don’t grant me permission to interpret and record the story the way that I choose to tell it. My intention is to uncover and express the artist’s intent, but I could be way off. I could even sell my recordings and make money without compensating the author’s loved ones for the time and effort that she put into creating the characters and scenarios. At least my recordings are added to the public domain catalog where I sourced the writings, but it still doesn’t feel right.

So then, why is my blog only protected by a Creative Commons license? Because I benefit from images that Creative Commons licensees make available. Choosing a Creative Commons license is my way of giving back to the Creative Commons community.

What do you think?

Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse

I’ve been listening to segments of many audiobooks to help me find my place in the voice acting world. Where am I needed? What are my limitations?

I was suprised to find that the audiobook versions that I heard of Siddhartha by Herman Hesse sounded like adventure novels. I understood it to be a poetic prayer of meditation, so I began recording my understanding of this text. Please let me know what you think.

Chapter One read by Grace Buchanan for the LibriVox First Chapter Collection 6.

Read the entire book at Project Gutenberg.

Listen to all the work that I’ve done for LIbriVox

This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: librivox.org.

Image credit:
Buddha, by nomo/michael hoefner, Creative Commons license BY-3.0

Hear Chapter One of Siddhartha in the LibriVox First Chapter Collection 6. My reading is #17.

The History of Emily Montague Vol. II, by Frances Moore Brooke

As I rehearsed for this recording, I was inspired by characters from Jane Austen books, movies, and audiobooks, especially Lydia Bennet (Pride and Prejudice), Emma Woodhouse (Emma), Lucy Steele (Sense and Sensibility), and Mary Musgrove (Persuasion).

The History of Emily Montague is a novel about courtship during the mid 1700s between silly young girls and awkward gentlemen. Frances Moore Brooke probably influenced Jane Austen’s work, as their lifelines overlapped, and they were both from England, and their writing styles are similar (e.g., characters, issues.

Volume 1 describes the predicament of Emily Montague as she discovers that marrying Sir George Clayton, the man whom her uncle chose for her, might not be in her best interest as she finds herself attracted to Colonel Rivers. Her decision to spend the winter with her friend Arabella Fermor increases her opportunities to distance herself from Sir George and align with Colonel Rivers.

I recorded the letters that Arabella wrote in Volume 2 from the 4-volume set. Most of her correspondence is to her and Emily’s dear friend back in London (Lucy Rivers) who happens to be Colonel Rivers’s sister, and who has her own romantic story to tell. Here are the first two letters from Volume 2.

 

The entire second volume at Internet Archive, recorded for LibriVox.


I am delighted by this story’s turn from Arabella’s immersion in flirting to her describing the Canadian landscape at some length. What an interesting choice of character to do such a job for the author as she was the first European to publish a novel in and about Canada. I am familiar with “one of the noblest works of nature,” which Arabella describes, and am saddened as I think about how it has changed as a result of development, especially in the U.S., particularly from the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Listen to the entire first volume of this book.
Listen to the entire second volume of this book.
Listen to the entire third volume of this book.
Listen to the entire fourth volume of this book.

Read the entire book at Project Gutenberg.

Listen to all the work that I’ve done for LIbriVox.

This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: librivox.org.