Tag Archives: tradition

Reblog: Meet Roderick Gladwish’s Main Character

originally posted at :

Meet My Main Character

Monday, 23 June 2014
by Roderick Gladwish

+Grace Buchanan (Weaver Grace)  tagged me to continue a tradition of bloggers on the Meet My Main Character Blog Tours.  This tour asks the author of works-in-progress to answer questions about their main character and then tag another author to do the same.

Grace’s character is a real historical figure, her grandmother’s grandmother.  She lived in a fascinating part of American history, when the USA and the people coming to it, start to truly found a nation.  Funny thing is, history books are stuffed with rulers and power brokers, yet Nations are formed, changed and protected by the millions who never get a mention.  I’m a history nut so I’m biased and her character was interesting.

Here’s my go at answering the same questions…

1. What is the name of your character? Is he/she fictional or a historic person?

Jeptha of Nonewharl, everyone calls him Jep.  He’s a fictional character based on the many young men who did, and still do, go to sea in search of adventure.

2. When and where is the story set?

It’s set in the early seventeenth century, at first on the fictional islands of Nonewharl, which are much like the Faroe Islands, set in the stormy North Atlantic Ocean.  Jep and his people are descendants of Nose settlers and shipwrecked ‘strays’.  Then he ventures into the Atlantic and then the North Sea on his first, fateful voyage as a professional sailor. . .

read more at Roderick’s blog

Advertisements

Meet historical fiction author Ronda K. Reed

written by Ronda K. Reed

Thank you again for the opportunity, Grace Buchanan. As I said, blogging is new to me and this is my first blog tour. Meet My Main Character Blog Tours are similar to radio interviews: tune in now to questions posed to me, and July 8, 2014 for answers to the same questions posed to other authors. This tour asks the authors of works-in-progress to answer questions about the main characters of their fictional novels. Grace is working currently on a historical fiction. She describes her main character, Polly, as “how she sees her grandmother’s grandmother “. Grace’s genealogical research is not only rendering invaluable information about her familial roots, but also is providing a solid historical background from the 1800’s full of hardships and conflicts for Polly. I find this fascinating and look forward to reading her book.

Elizabeth Mohney

Nostalgia, is something Grace and I have in common when we write. Bringing the past back to life and breathing new words and life into our characters gives great satisfaction to not only us, as writers, but hopefully, to our readers as well. My work is historical and leans a bit toward literary with magic realism.

Now, for the questions and answers about my fictional novel-in-progress:

  1. What is the name of your character? Is he/she fictional or historical? Ella’s full name is unusual, like she is. She is of mixed blood: Native American, Hispanic, and Caucasian. Her full name is MarcellaAwinita Bennett.Awinita means “fawn” in Cherokee. Ella is purely fictional, as are her friends Carolyn, or “Carly” Rose, and Dawn Davidson. The secondary characters play huge roles in the story. In fact, I thought about three Main Characters but decided against it.
  2. When and Where is the story set? The story begins in the early 1960’s in a fictional small southern town in Texas. This town is mostly a farming community, but new industry is nudging its way in.  What is fascinating, is what is nestling on one side of the town. It is many acres of a heavily wooded closed-down-for-decades State Park, called Break Ridge Falls Park. Ella’s family resides on a gravelled farm-to-market road on the outskirts of town. Their property acreage ends at the edge of the woods.
    The Walking Bridge

  3. What should we know about her?  Ella, along with having mixed blood, is also adopted. By sheer luck, a kind middle-aged childless white couple adopted her, taking her in when Ella was two, rescuing her from a bad situation which left Ella scarred badly on her left arm.  Ella thankfully remembers little of that time, while being coddled by her new loving parents. While the large scar on the inside of her arm is physical, the internal scars begin surfacing during her school years.
  4. What is the main conflict? What messes up his/her life? The main conflict is the problems that are always present  and confusing in a coming of age story: peer pressures, dealing with the opposite sex, and bullies. Adding to this mixed bag are racial slurs, and one character in particular that hands out misery throughout two decades to these three girlfriends. Also conflicting in theory is the discovery that these three young girls make of the mysterious and somewhat scary Break Ridge Falls Walking Bridge in the thick woods. It is an urban legend to the town, well-speculated and gossiped about. Not many have found the bridge and lived to tell about it, but once the bridge finds you, it brings magic realism.
  5.  What is the personal goal of the character? Ella’s goal is self-acceptance; to love herself, discover her past and make peace with it, and to believe and protect true friendship no matter what, all while finding out the truth about the walking bridge.
  6. Is there a working title for this novel, and can we read more about it? The title is The Walking Bridge and you can read more about it at my blog.
  7. When can we expect the book to be published? Hopefully, it will go through the editing process this year and be ready by the first of next year. Hopefully. 🙂

 

On Tuesday, July 8, 2014   I will be featuring some up-and-coming writers whom I met through the community Saturday Scenes at Google+.

Challa Fletcher
Sarah Brown
Samantha Dunaway Bryant

Thank you, Grace for this opportunity and sharing my love of writing.

Reaching Out: Social Justice Award

Bloggers Who Reach Out

Reaching out to others means at least calling out from a hole. I prefer when it means looking out to see what others are up to. I am even happier when it means interacting with others. The best is when we connect to grow.

Many bloggers reach out by interacting with readers on a regular basis. They produce posts from careful wording and editing and research. They give credit to their sources. Most of all, they shine light on issues that matter. I admire them, and want to express my appreciation by way of the Reaching Out: Social Justice Award.

Jenni of Unload And Unwind created the Social Justice Award to “acknowledge those whose work seeks to inform, aid and connect with others. It is a large world we live in and often there is such strife but the internet has made it smaller. Social media has given us the tools to make us closer and to find and disseminate new information and ideas, reach out to those who need it and speak out when there is injustice.”

I am one of her first nominees! I feel very honored to be recognized by a blogger who reaches out to many people while sharing her own challenges, in an inspiring way.

The conditions are:

  1. Thank the person who nominated you, and create a link back to their blog.
  2. Insert a Link back to the original award page to create a pingback so that Jenni can chart the progress of the award.
  3. Nominate no more than three people for this award, and write a short paragraph [or longer] saying why you chose each one, and what each one does.
  4. Display the badge somewhere on your blog, either in the sidebar or an awards page.

Honorable Mention

I am limited to three nominations. I would give the award to the following bloggers, but you have met them in other posts on my blog. Therefore, I am simply reminding you of them before I announce the award winners.

Jeff was the first person whom I thought of for this award. His blog Deconstructing Myths has been reaching out on WordPress since August 2012. He shines his light strongly and consistently on troubling issues, shares many links for further investigation, and stirs his readers to discuss the issues in his comments sections. His readers leave intriguing comments. His guest bloggers are some of the most outspoken people in favor of justice. On top of all of that, you can rely on his judgment when he guides you to some of the best of WordPress via his Jeffster Awards.

Jeff introduced me to Dandelion Salad, which has been a WordPress fixture since June 2007. It is a blog that acts much like a forum. DS has been one of the most useful places to find reports on events submitted by more than a dozen regular contributors (and many more less frequent ones), and articles and videos by the greatest Social Justice activists. This blog is quiet recently, only posting a few times each week instead of several articles every day, and its energy might resume if enough of us offer enough substantial support or persuasion.

Ohnwentsya posts numerous times every day on Spirit In Action. She began her blog in September 2011. Her posts are enlightening, empowering, and insightful. She collects articles from The Oracle Report, Truthout, Yes! magazine, and some of the other greatest sources. Her blog has the potential to provide nourishment for the roots of social justice movements, and a shift in planetary energy.

Award Winners

Many of the bloggers whom I read are equally qualified for this honor. I decided to come up with fair criteria to narrow the list of candidates, and select my three winners:

  • not previously featured on my blog
  • focuses on a social justice issue in a creative and effective way
  • promotes social justice by reaching out and connecting to share ideas that make us closer

I am awarding the Reaching Out: Social Justice Award to the following bloggers:

Carol of Voices From the Margins encourages conversations about how to raise awareness of diversity and its value. She describes using fascinating exercises in the cultural awareness workshops that she leads.

Danielle of Broken Light Collective presents a guest blogger each day who knows mental illness (personally, professionally, or socially), and who also photographs. Each image is inspiring, especially after reading the artist’s explanation of the significance of the photograph that they share. This blog is giving hope and support to people who are connected with mental illness. Photography is working as therapy for the photographers and viewers.

StoriesBellyHeader Diahann of Stories From the Belly appeals to sexual empowerment. She urges men and women to overcome shame by discussing — in healing ways — feminine and sexual experiences. She brings sex issues out of the closet, and repurposes the sex act as something for the participant(s) to completely enjoy.


I welcome comments about other social justice blogs that are important to share. (note: if you include “too many” links in your comment, the WordPress spam filter will hold it, and I will need to manually approve the comment. Please feel confident that I approve over 99% of the comments submitted to my blog — except unrelated advertising spam.)

Meet My Main Character Blog Tour

Jo Robinson tagged me to continue a tradition of bloggers. Meet My Main Character Blog Tours resemble radio interviews: tune in now for answers to questions posed to me, and a week later for answers to the same questions posed to other authors. This tour asks the authors of works-in-progress to answer questions about the main characters of their historical fiction novels. Jo describes her main character as being part of other-worldly myths that she (her main character) doesn’t believe in. Jo features this character in her Shadow People series. Shadow People: The Hunger coverJo and I write similarly: our characters tell us their stories, and we merely translate them into a language that you can read. And now, the questions and answers about my historical novel-in-progress:

  1. What is the name of your character? Is he/she fictional or a historic person? Polly is my grandmother’s grandmother, as I imagine her.

  2. When and where is the story set? Polly raised her family in the mid 1800s in the crude log cabin that her husbandbuilt in Pennsylvania, USA. My sister and I stirred up few clues about Polly and her family, through our genealogical research projects during the past few decades. I felt amused and then angered when I hit adead end inan historical reference book that declared that Polly’s family didn’t “succeed” because they didn’t develop their land into villages; they didn’testablish businesses on their land in the mid 1800s; they remained farmers.  I define “success” differently, thus I continue her story beyond the history books.
    Polly's mother Elizabeth

  3. What should we know about him/her? Polly grew up surrounded by people whom her parents and grandparents had grown up with in Germany. The adults were doing what they could to stay together in this land that was new to them. Their language was a unique combination of German and English; that is a fun puzzle to translate as I read their historical documents.
    Polly's husband William

  4. What is the main conflict? What messes up his/her life? Polly’s story is a fictional diary. She writes about reaching the age of marriage and child-rearing. She gives you the unfamiliar perspective of a young woman at that time in that culture. It is a time when her community’s life has become much easier and requires less creativity, but basic survival is still challenging. They were reviving their old ways as much as possible.

  5. What is the personal goal of the character? Polly has the new challenge of defining how to be happy and creative when strategies for survival have become easier and more familiar, and leisure time has become available. My personal goal is to help her figure that out.

  6. Is there a working title for this novel, and can we read more about it? I refer to it as Polly’s Diary, or Diary of a Modern Household. I have not yet shared any excerpts or notes beyond what I shared with you here. Leave me a comment, and I’ll be glad to keep you updated on its progress.

  7. When can we expect the bookto be published? Itwill be published after I finish writing it, or when someoneyanks it from me 🙂 I’m considering putting everything aside for a few weeks to see how far I can get if I focus on it single-mindedly. I am still choosing which word processing program to use to assemble the pieces that Ihave been writing on receipts, magazine page margins, junk mail and other scratch paper; in .pdf, .txt, .odt, .xls, and .doc files; and in my own diaries/journals. I welcome suggestions.
    I have a pile of resources that I nibble on. By the time that I read a few sentences, Polly has woken up to tell me more of her stories. I understand that historical fiction novels often take years to write, especially when the writer does a lot of research into primary documents like wills, letters, and church records, in addition to historians and cousins. Therefor, I might have a few more years before publishing, since I just started writing this story a year and a half ago.
Thank you Jo

for sharing your enthusiasm about my novel.

The Tour Continues…

Susanne Alleyn writes historical fiction with impeccable credentials, as a result of extensive research. In addition, her potent writing makes me consistently breathless. Reading her work is no spectator pastime; it makes my pulse race. You must read what she says about the sequel to her successful book at her blog.

I enjoyed reading about where Roderick Gladwish’s ideas came from when he wrote his trashy story: “Trashy” because it’s about the Green Trash Vortex, and the technology that might clean it up in the future, and what that might lead to. You can read it in Jupiter SF, Issue XLIV, April 2014. Read about the status of his most recent work at his blog.

Ronda K. Reed’s flash fiction stories catch my attention when she submits them to the Moderator Selected Writing Exercises at the Writer’s Discussion Group on Google+. Her tour site is here at my blog where she talks about her book’s main characters, and its mysterious landmark.

I was also hoping that Jess of JMGajda would participate. She caught my attention when I read some of her futuristic and supernatural work. In the midst of her high-risk pregnancy, she took the time to join this tour! You must read about the cultures that challenge her main character!