Category Archives: Creativity

River Novel Notice

Enjoy these rough excerpts from the novel that I am writing (I refer to it as my River novel, or River Cuts), and please leave feedback here, or at Google+ where I am developing these scenes. Everyone who “Likes” and makes suggestions motivates me to continue exploring this story. Some of the most effective comments ask for more detail about a moment, event or character.

Image of River with knife, and title, "River Cuts"

Morning Fruits – added March 28, 2013

Interview – added February 14, 2015

After Interview – added February 21, 2015

Del’s River – NEW! May 2, 2015

Yoga – added November 29, 2014

The Dance Begins – added October 4, 2014

Love The One You’re With? – added January 24, 2015

NASCAR – added December 17, 2014

Just Ducky – added November 1, 2014

Sewing

Big Frog In A Small Pond – added December 27, 2014

Sex With the Stars – added December 20, 2014 – abridged for general adult audiences

Sex With the Stars – added December 27, 2014 – full adult version

Wine, Part 1 – added January 1, 2015

Wine, Part 2 of 2 – added January 17, 2015

In The Woods

At The Park

Full Moon, Part 1 –  added November 29, 2014

Full Moon, Part 2 – added December 6, 2014

Visiting

Like Alcoholics – added March 14, 2015

Migraine – Warning: some of the goriest writing I’ve done

9-1-1

The Next Morning – added October 11, 2014

To Milly’s – added October 18, 2014

Discovery – added October 25, 2014

Islands

“the best horror… forces us to confront ideas we might rather ignore, and challenges preconceptions of all kinds.”
Elements of Aversion, Elizabeth Barrette

I am updating this page every couple of weeks or so with my progress on my book.

Check out the rest of my blog while you’re here.

 

 

Photo credits:
Top photo: Ukraine dnepr at krementchug by Lutz Fischer-Lamprecht. Licensed by Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 Unported.
Kissing Crane Leg Knife, by James Case. Licensed by Creative Commons Attribution 2.0.
Both images modified by Grace Buchanan.

Bottom photo: Dnester_Rozvadiv by Szeder László. Licensed by Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0. Modified by Grace Buchanan.

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Reblog: CBC Creative Nonfiction Short List

Of course, when Brandee told me that her daughter died, I knew how painful that must be, but I had no idea, really. Her story gives me a glimpse of how painful losing a child is. I had never taken the time to imagine such detail, nor did I have the resources to do so.

Another friend of mine had told of “viewing” a parent from a small room, on the other side of a window. The “unpreserved body” had to be isolated, according to health law. I greatly appreciate that Brandee was able to be “with” her Erica. Less theatrical.

Thank you, Brandee, for letting your heart retch out this experience so we can tread more silently, touch more gently, and see more clearly what such an experience is like.

Dear Reader, you have an opportunity to read, comment and vote for this and the other four finalists at the announcement page for the 2014 CBC Creative Nonfiction Prize.

Canadian Dirtbags

I made the CBC nonfiction short list. I was unsure whether to mention it, when the list was announced yesterday. The story is nothing to do with the building or homesteading that remains the focus of this blog. It’s an intensely personal story. Both of these things factored against posting my news here.

Ultimately though: you are all a part of my journey and many have been since the start of this great experiment of ours. You’ve cheered on our victories and encouraged me during times of frustration, and graciously even shared your own triumphs, tribulations, and aspirations. I may not have met everyone face-to-face but you are just as real a community as the one that I live in.

Like all of our adventures, writing is something I’ve embarked on without a clear map or idea of where it’ll take me. This seems a good start though. You can…

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Reblog: Meet Susanne Alleyn’s Main Character

originally posted at:

The “Meet My Main Character” Blog Tour

June 23, 2014
by Susanne Alleyn

WeaverGrace tagged me to continue a tradition of bloggers begun here. Meet My Main Character Blog Tours resemble radio interviews: keep on reading for answers to questions posed to me, and a week or two later for answers to the same questions posed to a couple of other authors whom I’ve selected. This tour asks the authors of works-in-progress (in my case, the sequel to The Executioner’s Heir) to answer questions about the main characters of their historical novels. So, meet my main character . . .

What is the name of your character? Is he/she fictional or a historic person?

Charles-Henri Sanson is my main character, and he was a real person. Born in 1739, he was destined to be the master executioner—maître des hautes œuvres—for the city of Paris in the second half of the 18th century . . . Despite his official title and the “yuck” reaction most of us would have to a professional executioner, Charles Sanson was a decent, compassionate man trying to make the best of a terrible career that he was stuck with because of fate and social pressure . . . He realizes that he can never break away from the profession and title of executioner, and his goal becomes, instead, to be the most honorable and humane man he can be, within the job that he can’t escape, even during the Revolution. . .

read more at Susanne’s blog

Reblog: Meet Jessica Gajda’s Main Character

originally posted at:

The “Meet My Main Character” Blog Tour

June 24, 2014
by JMGajda

Last week the amazing Weaver Grace was kind enough to ask me to participate in an interview where authors of works-in-progress discuss the main character of their historical fiction. While the book I’m writing isn’t strictly historical fiction per se (it’s a fantasy based on a retelling of Little Red Riding Hood), it’s based on 16th – 18th century Afro-Brazilian culture and late medieval English nunneries.

I’ve been researching extensively, reading scholarly works such as Eileen Power’s eye-opening ‪Medieval English Nunneries:‪ C.1275 to 1535 (available for free on Kindle), which dispels any notions of quiet-living, pious women. It must be remembered that many women of this period who ended up in convents were not necessarily there because they felt called to serve God, but often because they had no choice. Late Medieval English nunneries were sometimes used as dumping grounds for unmarriageable or unwanted females of the nobility and the upper class (untitled, rich merchants and such) . . .

1. What is the name of your character? Is he/she fictional or a historic person?

Porcelana is my main character and she is fictional. She is an Afro-Brazilian albino who’s been hand-picked to train to become one of the warrior/nuns of Convento do Pano Vermelho (The Convent of the Red Cloth), the protectors of her town who hunt the savage wolves said to roam freely in the surrounding forests . . .

Young Porcelana
Young Porcelana (Photo of Young Afro-Brazilian Girl by Gustavo Lacerda)

My inspiration images for the young Porcelana are from the amazing Brazilian photographer Gustavo Lacerda whose website you can visit by clicking here . . .

read more at Jessica’s blog